Hearing icon
Signia™ AX

60-day free trial

Hearing icon
Resound™ One

60-day free trial

Hearing icon
Phonak™ Paradise

60-day free trial

Hearing icon
Online Care

Online Free Hearing Test

Hearing icon
In-Office Care

In-Person Test - Orland

DELTA EMPLOYEES TO WEAR BADGES IF FLUENT IN AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

Happy couple

Delta flight attendants who speak sign language will soon have the option to wear a pin to help better inform signing passengers they share a common language.

According to the airline, this makes them the first U.S. airline to officially offer sign language as part of their customer experience.

Delta employees who speak American Sign Language, or any of the more than 300 signed languages from around the world, will be able to wear a badge underneath their nameplate displaying their communication skills. The airline hopes that this will help to sign customers quickly to identify and connect with Delta team members who share the same language.

“Our mission is to connect the world, which starts with making travel easier for all people,” CEO Ed Bastian wrote on LinkedIn. “It’s a small step on our journey, but a powerful change as we seek to make the world a smaller, more inclusive place.”The new bar is a direct result of feedback from Delta customers, the ABLE Disability Business Resource Group for employees and the Advisory Board on Disability.

There have been several instances of passengers who speak sign language needing assistance in the air. Earlier this month, a Delta flight attendant wrote out an introduction and safety instructions for a 16-year-old passenger who was deaf and traveling by herself. And last year, a 15-year-old who was studying American Sign Language helped Alaska Airlines crew translate to a passenger who was blind and deaf.

Related Articles

You might be interested in...

Hearing

BRIEF POSTNATAL BLINDNESS TRIGGERS LONG-LASTING REORGANIZATION IN THE BRAIN

Temporary visual deprivation shortly after birth induces permanent auditory responses in the visual area of the brain, highlighting a crossmodal competition for brain territories during […]

Read More →
Ear Grid

SAY WHAT? HOW THE BRAIN SEPARATES OUR ABILITY TO TALK AND WRITE

Out loud, someone says, “The man is catching a fish.” The same person then takes pen to paper and writes, “The men is catches a […]

Read More →

UB RESEARCHERS TAKE IMPORTANT STEPS TOWARD UNDERSTANDING HOW ANIMALS MAKE SENSE OF THE AUDITORY WORLD

BUFFALO, N.Y. – Sit down with a friend in a quiet restaurant and begin talking, just before the dinner crowd’s arrival. Business is slow at first, […]

Read More →